Monthly Archives: May 2012

Fund it, build it, get on with it

Connecting Dulles International Airport, Washington D.C.’s primary international air hub, to the city’s subway system is a goal that has, until recently, received near unanimous support. A project that was perceived as essential for the region’s economy, transportation, and functionality is now mired in partisan dithering, posturing, and shenanigans. Which all seems rather absurd when there is basic agreement on the need for the project.

The lack of a convenient mass transit link from the main international airport to downtown in a city of Washington’s undeniable national and international relevance and stature is, in truth, incredible. When Dulles Airport was constructed in the 1970s, easy passenger access to the Metro was always intentioned. Only in recent years though has the plan really gathered steam.

But now the funding for this patently necessary project has become captive to acrimonious state and local politics. The lack of bipartisanship at the federal level is mirrored at the state level, and the state of Virginia is no exception.

Virginia looms large in presidential politics. A conservative leaning state, it is one of the key “swing” states that could determine this year’s presidential race. In 2008, it voted for President Barack Obama; in 2012, the Obama campaign hopes the state will again vote his way. The southern part of the state is more rural and conservative. The northern part, encompassing Washington D.C. suburbs, is more urban, liberal, and heavily congested, with other liberal pockets around university towns such as Charlottesville and Williamsburg.

At present, Virginians have voted into place office holders who are predominantly Republican, although its two senators in Congress are both Democrats. One of these Senate seats is up for grabs this November, with two former governors likely competing for it in one of the tightest, most expensive races this election. Present Republican Governor Robert F. McDonnell was widely considered a potential vice presidential running mate for probable Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney. That was before he became embroiled in an off-putting conservative pander this past legislative session that tried to legislate a compulsory vaginal ultrasound procedure for those in Virginia considering an abortion. The legislation failed, even with both houses of the state legislature being Republican controlled.

Phase 2 of Dulles Rail, or extending Metro’s Silver Line from Reston, Virginia, to Dulles Airport is, in theory, to be funded with federal, state, and Fairfax and Loudoun County assistance, plus revenue from the Dulles Toll Road. The Metropolitan Washington Airports Authority (MWAA) is overseeing construction of the Silver Line, including the proposed extension to Dulles. Phase 1 is expected to be finished late in 2013, while construction of Phase 2 to Dulles should ideally commence early in 2013.

The most recent brouhaha stems from a labour requirement in the general contract for Phase 2. The MWAA supports this pro-union clause, whereas the state government and the all-Republican supervisory board in Loudoun County, the county in which Dulles is located and through which the Silver Line extension would primarily pass, do not. Virginia is a “right-to-work” state, so the state feels any pro-union labour preferences would violate state laws. The state even called a special legislative session specifically to outlaw any consideration of labour agreements in the awarding of contracts. The two-year Virginia state budget was revealed recently—without the inclusion of any funding for the Silver Line.

For the second time, U.S. Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood, the remaining Republican in Obama’s cabinet, has helped mediate between the various parties. Thanks to the Secretary’s involvement, it appears that the WMAA will possibly weaken the pro-union labour provision. This would presumably permit the state to release its promised contribution of $150 million for the project and Loudoun County to commit to supporting the project. Let’s hope this compromise really comes to pass so that bidding for Phase 2 can proceed.

Another issue that could delay the proceedings is a federal audit of the WMAA. The airports authority has been criticized for opaque decision-making, top-heavy management, and its estimates of escalated tolls on the Dulles Toll Road. A preliminary report on the audit should be available shortly. This audit will hopefully result in greater transparency, changes in WMAA’s funding formula, and better atmospherics.

Funding the Silver Line certainly shouldn’t come on the backs of those using the Dulles Toll Road. Steep tolling on a major highway—thereby forcing users onto secondary roads and worsening the traffic patterns that the tolled road was supposed to address—will sound painfully familiar to road users in Johannesburg, South Africa, who are grappling with similar, although different, issues.

Part of the pushback is from Virginians in the southern part of the state feeling they shouldn’t be subsidizing a huge transportation project in the north from which they derive no benefit. Northerners would retort that they provide most of Virginia’s tax base in the first place.

The real issue behind the new resistance to the project stems from Republicans not wanting to fall in with the broader Democratic narrative. They do not want to boost employment, foster economic growth, or create aggregate demand through building infrastructure. They do not want to help fund an investment that would have a multiplier effect on employment and growth in the region. They do not want to increase spending and provide stimulus. They do not want to support unionised labour.  They want to cut back on public spending and shrink budgets. Such is the politics of economic recovery in the state of Virginia—and the United States.

Update on June 7, 2012: The Washington Post reports that the MWAA voted to drop the pro-union provision in the Silver Line contract, thereby paving the way for Virginian Governor McDonnell to come through with the promised $150 million. Now will Loudoun County’s Board of Supervisors support the project too? Stay tuned.

Update on July 3, 2012: In a 5-4 vote this morning, Loudoun County’s Board of Supervisors agreed to Phase 2 of the Silver Line. Funding issues were resolved by an agreement to create special tax districts around prospective Metro stops in the county and to increase tolls on the Dulles Access Road. There is still a dream for some federal funding. But, without further delay, bids on Phase 2 can now be placed. Progress indeed.

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